How to choose the right toothpaste

July 21, 2014

If you walk down the toothpaste aisle at the store and are completely overwhelmed, know you’re not alone. There is an array of varieties for consumers to choose from with different ingredients, flavors and purposes. So how do you choose? Take a look at the following tips to help narrow down which toothpaste is right for you.

Consider specialty toothpastes. Many types of toothpaste offer a specialty. Some are used to fight cavities, control tarter, strengthen or whiten your teeth. Others are available for individuals with sensitivity problems. Choose your toothpaste based on what you prefer and let me know if you have any questions!

Check out the ingredients. Most types of toothpaste contain fluoride, the most important ingredient in preventing tooth decay and cavity occurrences. Fluoride makes your tooth enamel stronger, preventing acidic damage from foods and drinks. Although many types of toothpaste and water contain fluoride, don’t use either as a replacement for dentist office visits.

Think about alternative choices. Because there is some scientific debate on the negative side effects that fluoride could have on your body, companies have created organic toothpastes, including Tom’s of Maine. Tom’s of Maine is an ADA approved toothpaste and has many benefits that non-organic toothpastes also provide.

For an all-inclusive list of ADA approved toothpaste, visit the American Dental Association’s website here,and make your next trip down the toothpaste aisle a simpler task.

 

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/tooth-enamel-erosion-restoration?page=2


Habits that damage your teeth

September 26, 2012

Chewing on ice—It may seem harmless, ice is just frozen water and water is good for you, right? Wrong. Chewing on hard, frozen cubes can chip or crack your teeth. Try chewing sugarless gum instead.

Tongue/lip piercings—Accidently biting down on a metal stud can crack a tooth. It can cause gum damage if the metal rubs against the gums. And since the mouth is a haven for bacteria, a piercing raises the risk of infections and sores.  

Opening things with your teeth—Using your teeth as a tool to open bottle caps or plastic packaging can cause them to crack or chip. Keep scissors and bottle openers handy.

Drinking pop—It can have up to 11 teaspoons of sugar per serving, plus phosphoric and citric acids, which eat away at tooth enamel. Diet pop may have less sugar, but it contains more acid in the form of artificial sweeteners.

Chewing on pencils—Just like chewing on ice, this can chip or crack your teeth. When you feel the need to chew, grab a stick of sugarless gum.

Bedtime bottles—Giving your child a bottle in bed may seem comforting, but it could lead to decay. By sleeping with a bottle in their mouth, their teeth are immersed in sugars all night.