A cavity-free Halloween

October 22, 2013

Halloween is just around the corner! I recently came across a candy alternative for school parties or your trick-or-treaters … involving fruit: http://underconstructionblog.typepad.com/under_construction/2010/10/halloween-fruit.html. For more tips and ideas, read my blog article, “A cavity-free Halloween

Smiles By Baker

Americans are projected to spend $2 billion on candy this Halloween. Try to avoid the sticky, chewy, hard and crunchy treats. Soft and sticky candies stick to the teeth, giving the decay-causing bacteria time to decay your teeth. Hard candies dissolve slowly in your mouth, coating your teeth with sugar for a long period of time. They can also chip your teeth and cause choking in younger children. Some Halloween candy alternatives:

  • Animal crackers
  • Pretzels
  • Stickers or temporary tattoos
  • Pencils, pens or erasers
  • Small packs of crayons
  • Bubbles
  • Plastic jewelry
  • Play-Doh
  • Lip balm

Can you think of any others? Post a comment with your ideas for alternatives to Halloween candy.

View original post

Advertisements

Halloween treats: Tips for parents

October 24, 2012

Halloween is the perfect time to teach children moderation in eating. Help kids include their sweet treats in a healthy eating plan, set limits on when and how much candy they can have, and stick to those limits. Inventory your children’s candy, and don’t let them eat too many treats at once. Most candy has a long shelf-life. Put the “treat stash” out of children’s reach and limit them to eating about two pieces of candy a day.

Teach kids that sweets can fit into their diet in limited amounts, maybe as part of a certain meal, as a snack with a fruit, etc. Combine a treat, such as a miniature candy bar, with a healthy snack like an apple. Make sure the child eats the apple first so they are less hungry for the treat. This provides them with the health benefits of the apple while teaching them healthier eating habits.

If your child comes home with too much candy and sweet treats, arrange a buyout. Pay a nickel or dime for each sweet treat they “sell” you, and let them “earn” money for a toy or game they want to buy. Remember that sugary Halloween candy contributes to tooth decay. Tooth brushing and flossing are extremely important after eating sweets or any foods that stick to the teeth.

(Source: Clemson University)


A cavity-free Halloween

October 17, 2011

Americans are projected to spend $2 billion on candy this Halloween. Try to avoid the sticky, chewy, hard and crunchy treats. Soft and sticky candies stick to the teeth, giving the decay-causing bacteria time to decay your teeth. Hard candies dissolve slowly in your mouth, coating your teeth with sugar for a long period of time. They can also chip your teeth and cause choking in younger children. Some Halloween candy alternatives:

  • Animal crackers
  • Pretzels
  • Stickers or temporary tattoos
  • Pencils, pens or erasers
  • Small packs of crayons
  • Bubbles
  • Plastic jewelry
  • Play-Doh
  • Lip balm

Can you think of any others? Post a comment with your ideas for alternatives to Halloween candy.